Has "The Office" Jumped The Shark?

"Jump the Shark" is a colloquialism coined by Jon Hein and used by TV critics and fans to denote that point in a TV show or movie series' history where the plot veers off into absurd story lines or out-of-the-ordinary characterizations, particularly for a show with falling ratings apparently becoming more desperate to draw viewers in. In the process of undergoing these changes, the TV or movie series loses its original appeal. Shows that have "jumped the shark" are typically deemed to have passed their peak.

The phrase refers to a scene in a three-part episode of the American TV series Happy Days, first broadcast on September 20, 1977. In the third of the three parts of the "Hollywood" episode, Fonzie (Henry Winkler), wearing swim trunks and his trademark leather jacket, jumps over a penned-in shark while water skiing.

Now it pains me to ask this but has my beloved "Office" jumped the shark? This season began with such promise but over the past few weeks has veered terribly off course with the whole "Michael Scott Papaer Company" story arc. Last night were two brand new episode and I don't think I laughed a total of 3 times.

On the other hand, "30 Rock" has still been fantastic and the new NBC show "Parks and Recreation" had a very solid pilot last night. In fact I'd say "Parks and Recreation" was funnier then the last 3 Offcie episodes combined.

Comments

Jason Grant said…
I don't know. I about died when Dwight and Andy were rocking out the guitar and banjo. But I concur, Parks and Recreation is off to an amazing start. When I heard that Amy Poehler and that guy from 'Human Giant' got signed for P&R I knew it would be great.
I don't watch the office but I really like that term. There are a lot of shows that have this problem and after a short period of time they stop making them. you don't have to stop General Viagra

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